Monthly Archives: February 2013

Fast Food

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The usual food court suspects

The usual food court suspects

While most think of burgers and fries as fast food, the name can apply to any type of quickly made food, so vender grub is actually classifiable as fast food.  It has a history far, far older than the fifties, thousands years more, back to the Roman years.  In Rome, which in some ways is a historical parody of our civilization in my point of view, several people’s diets relied on what they got from street venders [maybe they ate a panzerotti while watching people get eaten by lions in the arena].

Think you'd get the munchies while watching this?

Think you’d get the munchies while watching this?

It was the same in the rightfully named dark ages of Europe, where citizens that couldn’t afford a kitchen ate mostly what they bought from salesmen in the streets.  This type of vender-buyer lifestyle still reigns today, just ask someone from New York, or someone from India or China where street food is immensely popular.

Street food from around the world

Street food from around the world

The kind of Fast Food most people, even our friends in Asia [or to those people, their friends in North America] really did start in the fifties, before Ralph Nadar when Americans lived the dream of beautiful [unsafe but no one cared back then] cars, and didn’t know what was in their food, and being a teen meant living in the fast lane, anyone who saw Back to the Future knows what I’m talking about.  White Castle [hear about them now?  I didn’t think so] is the pioneer being the second Fast Food chain and the first to serve hamburgers and have the staple limited menu we all love and hate.  They sold their burgers for five cents a pop, remember inflation was a thing of the future back then.

White Castle in the 50's

White Castle in the 50’s

Because of that era that time travelers just love [Back to the Future, Quantum Leap, Star Trek etc…], now over two million American out of the 314 mil of them are fast food workers.  I wonder how many are teens.

The thing that makes them so popular, to put it bluntly, is the speed they cook at, and how other choices like chili or baked potatoes are also available.  The fact you can, but probably shouldn’t, eat a burger at the wheel of a moving car also has its appeal in today’s kind-of-like-the-fifties-but-with-more-political-and-economy-crap-era.

How many people do this everyday?

How many people do this everyday?

Hey, Canada is much the same way, I didn’t say we’re better than those guys down south [I didn’t say we’re worse either, so don’t you even think it].  North American and British cuisines aren’t the only ones being influenced.  Italian pizza has been changed from a thin to a thick crust, and giving different ingredients, and Chinese food has changed so much that actual Chinese people, by that I mean culturally more than anything else, couldn’t recognize some of the take-out we have now [it makes me wonder what they have in a greasy five dollar box being passed off as authentic].

Editor’s note: the video below is a little long at aprox 16 minutes.  But its funny and very enlightening.  Worth watching

Cheap, quick meat patties on a bun has spread like a virus, I don’t use that analogy positively or negatively, to other counties that before wouldn’t have dreamed of eating this stuff, like, for instance, Japan.

While I acknowledge vender food, I think the fast food chains is what most readers really want to, and should, know.  It is a very controversial topic, with films and books pointing the finger at fast food companies crying wolf for bad health, bad food, and bad economy.  A whole mess of junk, in effect.

A very popular book that was also made into a movie

A very popular book that was also made into a movie

Well, along with other modern innovations, fast food did emerge at the same time a lot of problems did. Could simple food companies really be to blame for a host of calamities, or is the wolf a fake?  It is incredibly popular, the simple good taste fat, salt, and sugar has, as well as the lack of some proper nutrients, does reach a wide audience with many different palates.  Secondly, its in our face, bill boards, brought-to-you-bys, television ads, pop culture references, schools, blah, blah, blah, blah etc, they’re here they’re here!  Fast food will take over the world, just don’t put on your tinfoil hat, it’s probably McDonald’s’ litter.

They're everywhere! They're everywhere!

They’re everywhere! They’re everywhere!

That’s all well and good, but it’s more the type of food that’s ‘the rub’ as they say.  Hamburgers have: high protein, good, high fat, bad if there is too much but is necessary, high salt, again, important but too much is bad.  Iron is in there as well, but, like we all know, veggies is where the vitamins come from, and I don’t mean french fries, which are fried to the point of being deficient.

Wasn't  the potato perfect before it was fried?

Wasn’t the potato perfect before it was fried?

Coke is obviously bad too, who said bubbling sugar water that nobody knows the ingredients of. On that topic, I was going to put the list down, until I figured out the pepsi bottle we have is diet.  I already knew they had water [of course] and caramel colours for colouring, but the rest I didn’t know.  “Contains: Carbonated water, Caramel Colour, Phosphoric Acid, Aspartame, [124 mg/355 ml, contains Phenylalanine] Sodium Benzoate,” the list goes on.

list of ingredients in teeny tiny writing

list of ingredients in teeny tiny writing

By the way, Sodium Benzoate is not the salt that we know, that’s another Sodium.  I’m pretty sure most of those chemicals are sugar substitutes, here’s the regular Pepsi ingredient list [courtesy of Wikipedia] “In the United States, Pepsi is made with carbonated water, high fructose corn syrup [a very bad thing for your health, and is a replacement for sugar], caramel colour, sugar [for Petey’s sake WHY?  You have the sweet fructose crap!] Phosphoric acid [acid in your drink, umm healthy!], caffeine, citric acid [don’t worry, that’s the same kind from lemons or oranges; citrus] and natural flavours.”  That’s an actual quote from Wikipedia, excluding the brackets, obviously that was me.  The caffeine-free varieties of Coke and Pepsi both have the same recipes just without caffeine.

According to Wiki in double blind taste tests, most people could not tell the difference in taste

According to Wiki in double blind taste tests, most people could not tell the difference in taste

That didn’t sound too great did it?  Well, that’s just coke, and that’s just the very beginning of it all.  It’s starting to look worse and worse for the fast food guys, especially with movies like Super Size Me or Food Inc., which takes a look at the disgusting ways livestock is treated.  I have two facts more to give.  One, the companies won’t change unless there is incentive to, meaning that they do whatever gets them more customers.  Two, not all places are this bad.  There are several places, chains too, including Subways and other places to an extent, that are far better than abused animals and customers, so if you really want to save the world, don’t hate fast food, just eat better fast food.

Urban Eatery - The Eaton Centre

Urban Eatery – The Eaton Centre

Look at the Eaton Centre’s food court, there are all kinds of delicious and nutritious things there, and next time you go there, or your home’s equivalent of it, go to the more exotic foreign option instead of greasy, disgusting slop you don’t even like that much anyway.  I might sound a little extreme, but what’s causing the problem, the Holy Ghost?  You tell me, I know as much as anyone at this point.

Editor’s note: Any excuse to throw in an Eddie Izzard clip.  Mention Holy Ghost and voila:

But wait, isn’t this all a little hypocritical coming from a food blogger, someone who goes to all kinds of ridiculously unhealthy places as a hobby?  Well, for starters, I only eat like that when eating out, when I’m at home, I eat the best I can, and I exercise, treats are okay for anyone, health freaks would agree.  Also, I try knew foods, one of my favourite restaurants in Mediterranean, the other Pakitstani, another Indian Fusion, one Japanese and one Mexican.

Now for my opinion and voting of this cuisine in the months long cuisine contest.

Ganesh - god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune

Ganesh – god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune

As I’ve said before, it is probably the only one that’s controversial, and that is a big obstacle, even Ganesh would have trouble with it [wiki it].  So we’ll do it the standard way:

Taste: while generally hamburgers taste good, you have to know which place to go to, since several places serve rather bland stuff, and mass produced flavours lose something when treated so industrially.  Some fast food chains are delicious, but it takes a lot of trial and error to figure out which ones

Health: Oh boy.  Burgers, shakes, fries, cokes, ice creams, cakes, chicken nuggets that you don’t want to know what they’re made of, does that sound healthy to you?!  As I said before, it takes some good amount of knowledge to find healthy fast food, and when it gets to the bigger, international chains, it gets even harder.  This wouldn’t be so bad if so many fast food places, and processed food companies, deceive and, in essence, lie to us about what’s in our food.  I’ll be generous and say that the healthier places make it all right and save the score, but they don’t really

Variety: well that’s a stumper.  There are some chains that have rather exotic and foreign items, but even then it’s mostly ‘Chinese’ grease that isn’t really Chinese.  I’ll say there aren’t many options here when it comes to variety, excluding some few, smaller chains.

fast food in america

Will this cuisine reign supreme?  Well… It’s okay to great in some places, but it gets harder and harder to find good quality, and the healthier the slimmer the pickings. I think this cuisine has, not had, potential, but only if some serious changes occur in our culture.  All I can say is that it is really too hard for me to place, and I’m being nice.  If I felt like being mean [our brutally honest, depending on your view] I’d be getting really nasty and snarky, but I don’t want to drown in controversy, which leads to arguments and hate mail.  If this wasn’t one of my more happy cuisine posts, then I’m sorry, it’s the truth

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Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs

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Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs Exterior

Despite the awful title [how many clichés can one fit into five words?] my family decided to try this place, which had just newly opened, because all the best places we went to; we ate at before they got critical reception.  Well, actually some of the worst places I’ve ever been were new at the time, but that didn’t quite apply in this case.

Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs Interior

Frank’s has a comfortable amount of space, unlike paulette’s chicken and donuts and the burger’s priest [all lower case to accentuate mediocrity] which are in the same genre, except I don’t know why they decided to keep the stools with the extra room.  Is it some kind of fad, or are back rests just too mainstream?  The rest of the décor was good, the wooden tables were better than most hyper-modern I-can-see-myself steel counters, and the collage of hot dog eaters [including JFK] was another way Frank’s actually cared about good seating, instead of forcing people to find a bench outside or fight over wobbly booster seats.

Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs mural

I guess it goes to show that you should ask not what you can do for your restaurant, but ask what your restaurant can do for you.

I’m not sure if that has the aforementioned president rolling in his grave with joy or anguish, but hopefully I’ll stay away from Apollo 11 or Cuban Missile Crisis references at least.

Now that I’ve talked about good first impressions, I should also mention no music was blaring now that I think of it, it’s time to go on to the food.

Hot Dog choices

Hot Dog choices

Sides and beverage choices

Sides and beverage choices

Hot dogs are kind of a different food to get right.  The thing is that not a great many of people really tried, hamburgers [another European recipe that Americans added bread to] are more popular to tweak, and most people remember their burning canines from the street vendor’s downtown.

image courtesy of travelnewsstories.com

image courtesy of travelnewsstories.com

The basics were right, the meat wasn’t buried in the bun, nor was the bread collapsing and spilling food everywhere, but toppings were something altogether different.

"Frankie Goes to Buffalo"

“Frankie Goes to Buffalo”

My Buffalo dog had a lot of good flavours, such as the sour-savoury sauces, including wing sauce, that were put in just the right amount, the vegetables were super fresh and crunchy, not just a poor excuse to call it healthy, and the fried panko coating  added real substance instead of just being disgustingly bad for you.  On that topic, the whole menu’s ideology is creativity and ingredients from all over the globe being put into one, instead of huge amounts of food [double down anyone?] that no one needs as the only way to get any taste at all, Frank’s shows that quality makes better food than quantity.  That’s why I love Big Chubby Burger, which has a very clever menu, and hate the burger’s [false] priest, whose greatest innovation is to pile cheese and grease onto a tiny, crumbling patty.

Fancy-zza

Fancy-zza

Mom’s Italian dog was pretty alright too, but not quite as good as mine.  Nothing was wrong, the mozzarella and pepperoni in no way messed up the dish, which you might think it would, it just simply wasn’t the best.

Frankathenapolis

Frankathenapolis

My Grandmother’s Greek dog [is Frank’s going Around the World in Eighty Days, and no, I wasn’t thinking of the Jackie Chan film] was actually kind of a bust, it’s salad like toppings were way too big for the bun, and they all fell off.

all the toppings fell off

all the toppings fell off

What she was left with ( since only a small amount of olive oil and vinegar dressing was put on) was an unseasoned beef wiener on a bun.

Traditional Poutine

Traditional Poutine

We also had some poutine with our hot dogs.  For a place based off of a weird dude on the street with grill on wheels, it sized up well.  The gravy was delicious, the fries were homemade, and the cheese curds were generous and in every sense of the word, just right.

Behold - the melted cheese!!!

Behold – the melted cheese!!!

The cheese was also melted, showing how hot it was really cooked. Their poutine was the perfect side.

We also had the cinnamon sugar mini donuts, excluding my Gran who was too full and utterly refused to eat anymore.

Cinnamon Sugar Donuts

Cinnamon Sugar Donuts

They were made quickly right there, like Tiny Tom’s (from the EX) as my mom pointed out, so they were warm and fresh.

Donuts being made fresh to order

Donuts being made fresh to order

The donuts were fantastic, the complete opposite of paulette’s overly sweetened, chemical laced, dry pieces of hell, and also worked well as a desert.

While I wouldn’t go to the moon or to a war between Russia and America for it [oops], Frank’s food is recommendable, along with several places in the area of Kensington.  Like I said before, for a restaurant based off a vending cart, and given an ugly title, Fancy Frank’s Gourmet Hot Dog is better than most would think.

Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs 326 College Street
Fancy Franks Gourmet Hot Dogs on Urbanspoon

Cafe California

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Cafe California exterior

Another Winterlicious joint, Cafe California, was a big trip into my past.  For one thing, it is named after the State I was born in, which is also a bit of a reminder of the politics that lead to my family being deported [don’t even ask what they were, if you’re curious watch a Michael Moore documentary], and as if that wasn’t enough, it was in the exact same neighborhood as my old school, Church Street Public School, and what happened there is personal too.  If you’re really curious about it… stop being a busybody [a joke, of course].  This was also when a big snow storm was supposed to arrive, but the hordes of shoveling neighbors and trucks skidding on slush was the day after we went, so we made it just in time.

snow storm toronto

Ironically for a restaurant named after a State where the only seasons are hot summer and not that cold winter, Café California was adorned with snow flakes everywhere that added a really nice touch [or just honoring Winterlicious].  Right next to it is Acme Burger, which also stirred memories of the time my sister worked at one, for two seconds.  Why it’s called that, is like asking a teenager about Sir Francis Drake, and the only answer they get is because of the video game series Uncharted.  For those who don’t know what that means, it’s like asking someone about Nazis but without telling you something from Indiana Jones.

Since there wasn’t a TNT explosion or an anvil that beaned someone on the head, I’m assuming it isn’t related to the factory.

image courtesy of ohbythewayblog.blogspot.com

image courtesy of ohbythewayblog.blogspot.com

Now let’s finally step away from memory lane, indestructible coyotes, and gun-toting archeologists  and back to the restaurant that I’m supposedly reviewing.

Cafe California interior

Another place that is armed with a coat rack, which is a big plus, and also really friendly service. The décor was pleasant as well, including the beads on the windows, and the square lay-out of the seating area.

But all this is mostly irrelevant if the food is bad.  Actually, it’s rather like a summer blockbuster movie with 3-D HD Surround Sound special effects when the story is bad.

Winterlicious menu

Winterlicious menu

About the menu above, I noticed that a lot of the foods, especially when they came to the table, where Indian in some way.  If an Indian person, by that I mean someone born and raised there, had eaten here, they would’ve enjoyed it.  I had the spring rolls, my grandmother had the beet and goat cheese salad, and my mom had the daily soup, which was a mild curry.

Clockwise from the top: My springrolls, Mom's curry soup and Nana's beet salad

Clockwise from the top: My springrolls, Mom’s curry soup and Nana’s beet salad

All were actually really nice, the beets and goat cheese were not too strong in anyway, the curry was likewise really good in a more herbal way, and the vegetarian spring rolls had flavour that worked most excellently with the plum sauce.  I also liked how there were warm but without a giant steam pocket that burns your mouth after biting into it.  Note: the curry soup had something  in it that sank to the bottom of the bowl, and my mom couldn’t finish it because of her nut allergies.  I would say that you should ask the waiter about the ingredients used if you have any food allergies.  I noticed how, along with other cultural cuisines, Indian dishes were quite popular, and were handled well.

Complimentary bread with olive oil and balsamic vinegar for dipping

Complimentary bread with olive oil and balsamic vinegar for dipping

The free bread was great, since they offered fancier marble and rye breads with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, instead of cheap and easy garlic bread.  I think that shows some extra care.

For the main course, I had the beef stir fry with mango, my grandma had the curry chicken, and my mom had the grilled Atlantic salmon.

Beef Tenderloin and Mango Stir-Fry

Beef Tenderloin and Mango Stir-Fry

The stir fry was splendid, the beef was perfect for it along with the sauce, and I thought the tropical salad went with it surprisingly well.

Chicken Madras

Chicken Madras

The chicken had a nice sauce, and was milder, and I’d recommend it to people who don’t like as much spice as I do.

Atlantic Salmon Fillet

Atlantic Salmon Fillet

I really liked the salmon, which surprised me because usually I don’t care for that type of fish, I think the grilling helped with that.  We all agreed the veggies were done just right; the carrots in particular weren’t over cooked.

At this point I was thinking that they’d have to really tank [top] the desserts to get a bad score, which is very unlikely to happen.  Or is it predator drone the deserts in this modern era?  Maybe it’s F-18, but I’m just guessing. (Editor’s note: I believe Callum is doing a play on words with the use of “tank”; leading to the drone and F-18 reference.  We’re not sure.)

Sometimes the author of this blog goes off on some weird tangents

Sometimes the author of this blog goes off on some weird tangents

I had the, surprise, surprise, chocolate mouse cake, my mom had the crème caramel, and my grandma had the five berry desert.

Chocolate Mousse Cake

Chocolate Mousse Cake

The chocolate cake was okay, but not as moist as it sometimes is, I’ve often said that they are hard to mess up, but some places actually have had better chocolate cakes, but this one hasn’t fired its missiles completely.  I’ve had far better at other places but I’ve also had far worse, but this wasn’t the highlight of the meal for me.

Five Fruit Crumble

Five Fruit Crumble

The berry dessert was probably the best, it was crunchy and the berries were sweet and a little bit sour, and yes, it had walnuts.

Creme Caramel

Creme Caramel

The crème caramel was light and had a sweet, caramel taste that.  Actually I find that there’s hardly any flavour in most crème caramels, I personally think they taste like sugared aerosol would[aerosol’s an incredibly light and air-like solid used by NASA to get comet fragments in space], so I don’t like them that much.  All I can say is that this didn’t taste eggier than an omelet, unlike the one from Le Petite France.

All in all, Café California, although the name [coming from the guy who rambled about F-18s] makes no sense, is quite a nice place, and the multi-cultural techniques were really good.  This is recommendable for sure, and perhaps even a good go-to place. So, final verdict—ah, what’s this?

Oh great, it’s the F.B.I..  I think they’re not too pleased about those political cracks.  All right, I don’t have much time, they’re inside the house.  I recommend this place immediately foavopwhnv avho[ry9 bklgt=t8yqaun b

[Anyone who doesn’t get that that was an elaborate joke needs to stop taking things so seriously.  Peace.]

Cafe California 538 Church Street
Cafe California on Urbanspoon

La Petite France

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la petite france exterior

Le Petite France is the first place I’ve been to this year via Winterlicious.  I owe them quite a few other places, some that I loved like Fifth Element, some that I disliked like C5 or Peter Pan, and one that I absolutely despise known as Wish [the horror, the horror].  So I have four characters to thank here, Winterlicious, my mom for doing all the technical stuff and eating the food with me, The Toronto Transit Commission for taking all the way across the city to this place, and Bill Gates for inventing the Windows system I write this stuff on.  I’ll also mention Eddie Izzard because he’s in this post. Like pretty much every restaurant I reached through ‘licious, this is far out of our price range normally.  Since French cuisine is usually pigeon-holed into being freakishly expensive, and the fact I was born in California probably hindering my Canadian French-learning abilities [related Friends clip below], I’ve never tried much French cuisine outside of Harvey’s poutine.  Needless to say I wasn’t expecting that here.

We got here at one o’clock, and it was busier than the Apple Store at The Eaton Center when a new model comes out on Saturday.  Or maybe it was the same, I’m more than happy being a few generations behind.  This is where I give a huge kudos to the severs, one waiter, one waitress, and [I think] one bartender, since the service was quick for us in a way that it seemed like there weren’t about twenty or so other tables for them to attend to as well.  They also were friendly after the meal, which shows actual caring, something really important in customer serving and something forgotten in other fancier restaurants [excluding Fifth Element, of course].

la petite france interior

While you may want to come here during Winterlicious for better prices, the bills aren’t that sky-high anyway, so you could come here anytime anyway.  Considering this, the décor and setting was more expensive than you would think, with coat racks, and cloth napkins in the wine glasses.  Here’s the menu.

la petite france menu

The Waiter said the soup of the day was cream of mushroom, but when mom got her soup of the day, it was orange.  This had me thinking that it was the funny kind from the woods that gave you hallucinations, but mom said it tasted like potato.  I think what happened was that they had cream of mushroom but ran out and the waiter wasn’t informed because it got too hectic in there.

Mushroom soup?

Mushroom soup?

As for the actual soup, to be honest it was a little bland, but all it missed was salt and pepper, which was at the table anyway.  I had the crab cake, which was a generous size for a prefixed menu appetizer, and was delicious.

Crab cake appetizer

Crab cake appetizer

It was good by itself, but I liked the spicy seafood sauce with it and the mango [that’s what it tasted like] salsa worked as a counter-balance.

Then came the entrees, which were both meat dishes.  Mom had the Chicken with mashed potatoes  (editor’s note:  Coq au Vin, actually)  and I had the pork tenderloin [the second time quitting pork failed, this time for reasons more complicated than the first time] stuffed with apple and sided with roasted potatoes. Both came with peas and gravy.  I was a little surprised how North American that style of cooking was, but Italians don’ta talk likea thisa and the Irish don’t eat horsemeat so maybe I just had my expectations a little off.  Since the staff was nice, venom isn’t flowing into Windows Vista, but I’ll still keep a sense of constructive criticism, instead of going ‘yippee kay-ya mo!#@%%!@’ with literary weapons like I’ve done with other places.

Stuffed Pork Loin

Stuffed Pork Loin

It was hard to see how they were going to ‘stuff’ apple into that particular cut of meat, and all I really got was a small burnt skin in one of the two tenderloins.  If I may suggest, if you really want to serve apple with the pork, I’d recommend a marmalade or salsa, or a different cut of pork that has enough room inside to fit apple in.  I’m no French chef, but I’m just throwing out theories.  For the meat itself, it was nice, I wouldn’t say fall-off-the-bone tender, but it had a nice toothiness to it, my only problem was that it took longer to cut with a knife, although sharper silverware could fix that.  My mom said she found it a little dry.  The potatoes were a little bland, if you want my opinion I’d cut the potatoes into large slices, or mini potatoes into smaller quarters instead of tiny cubes, that way the flavour isn’t so spread out.

Coq au Vin

Coq au Vin

Mom’s chicken was nicer, and the mashed potatoes were tasty and different, with a heavy hand with the butter, no comment if that’s good or bad.  The gravy was nice, although mom got more particular about its consistency, but everyone loves to argue.

Now for dessert, and there’s no cake or death this time.

I had the Chocolate Mousse Cake [how Canadian] and mom had the {insert name of French dessert please (Crème Caramel)}.

Chocolate Mousse Cake

Chocolate Mousse Cake

I rather liked the mousse cake, I’ve often said that the big problem with it is that it’s easy to get right, indeed, only Peter Pan got it messed completely, if memory serves.  But they did a good job here as well, with some nice touches like the berry sauce, the garnish, and those little crunchy chocolate bits inside.

Creme Caramel

Creme Caramel

Mom’s {name}, which I thought was a lemon tart because of the yellow colour, was all right but tasted mostly like egg.  Mom says it’s because it was over cooked.  I’ve never cooked one-cell dishes before [the egg yolk and whites are just one giant cell], well, to be honest I’ve never cooked anything excluding sandwiches or microwaved leftovers, so I really don’t know what to say.  That kind of light dessert isn’t my taste anyway, I prefer heavier ones.

pic courtesy of ingestiondigest.com

pic courtesy of ingestiondigest.com

If you’re wondering how heavy, one time I literally had a dinner sized plate of chocolate, with two brownies, three scoops of chocolate ice cream, three spurts of whipped cream, and drizzled hot fudge at Mr. GreenJeans .  While the portions are certainly generous here, they won’t kill you, and they won’t leave you bankrupt either, unlike practically every eatery I’ve disliked.

On a scale of thumbs, with a maximum of three thumbs up for the five best, and two thumbs down and a very rude blurred finger up for the absolute worst, I think the consensus here is one thumb up.  The only part of the meal I personally had any valid complaints about was the main course, and mostly for the pork tenderloin.  The setting was brilliant, the service friendly and quicker than The Flash, and La Petite France is nicer than any other restaurant in the area, especially the mall across the street.  If you’re in the area, I’d recommend this to you and your friends.

La Petite France 3317 Bloor Street West
La Petite France on Urbanspoon